Can you discriminate against a ‘non-disabled’ employee on grounds of disability?

 So, here we are: January. Christmas has come and gone and the warm lights of December have been replaced with the wind and rain of January. Sigh. But anyway, how was your Christmas? I hope it was a time of rest and good health.

My Christmas? As usual, it was filled with random discussions around the Christmas dinner table including, as ever, conversations about weird and wonderful Employment Law cases. In particular, some of my family members were shocked to hear that a non-disabled employee can suffer disability-related discrimination. One even suggested that I make the subject into a blog when I returned to work and, me being me, I couldn’t resist such an invitation…

So what am I talking about? Well, this was the case of Chief Constable of Norfolk v Coffey which concerned a female police officer who applied for a job in another police force. The police officer had a progressive hearing condition with tinnitus which, going forward, would continue to worsen. When originally recruited for her current police force, she failed the meet the usual criteria for police recruitment due to her low level of hearing but, after the police force arranged a practical functionality test, she was passed for duty and assigned for front-line duties. There were no concerns over her performance during her time in the role.

The issues started in 2013 when she applied to transfer to a new police force. As was standard, she attended a pre-employment health assessment. The medical practitioner concluded that, whilst her hearing level was technically just outside the usual police force parameters, she performed her current role with no difficulties and a practical functionality test was recommended. However, the new police force refused to follow this recommendation and, instead, declined her request to transfer due to her hearing below the recognised standard and, rather importantly, commented that it would not be appropriate to accept a candidate outside of the recognised standard of hearing because of the risk of increasing the pool of police officers placed on restricted duties.

Will the abolition of Employment Tribunal fees result in ‘old’ 2013-2017 cases being permitted in Tribunal?

Employment Tribunal fees are illegal. This was declared on 26th July 2017 by the Supreme Court in R (on the application of Unison) v Lord Chancellor. Put simply, from that day onwards, Employment Tribunals completely scrapped both issue fees (the fee for submitting a claim form to Tribunal) and the hearing fee (the fee incurred…

European Court of Justice gives OPINION on unpaid and untaken holidays

Does a worker’s holiday entitlement continue to accrue into successive years if they do not take their annual leave because their employer will not pay them for these holidays? The Advocate General at the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has answered ‘yes’ to this question, in a non-binding opinion. In the case of King v…

Providing information about sickness absence in a reference ruled as discriminatory

Mr Paul Mefful began working as a volunteer at Southwark CAB in 2000. In 2003 he was employed as a general adviser and in 2004 he was promoted to senior adviser at Merton and Lambeth CAB following a competitive selection process. In May 2004 he became a specialist services manager. In (what was then) a Legal Services…

Disability Discrimination: Adjustments for candidate with Asperger’s Syndrome

In the recent case of Government Legal Services v Brookes UKEAT/0302/16, the Employment Appeals Tribunal (EAT) upheld the decision of the Employment Tribunal (ET) that requiring a job applicant with Asperger’s to take a multiple-choice test as part of the recruitment process, amounted to indirect discrimination. Background The facts of the case were that the Government Legal…

Can workers receive payment for ‘sleeping’ at work?!

The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has recently considered this question, more specifically whether workers are entitled to the national minimum wage when ‘on-call’ (or sleeping!) at work. In the case of Focus Care Agency v Roberts, along with two other cases heard at the same time (Frudd v The Partington Group Ltd and Royal Mencap Society…

EAT Judgment: There can be no disability-related harassment claim without first establishing the disability

In the recent case of Peninsula Business Service Ltd v Baker, the Claimant had advised his manager that he had dyslexia and had also provided a psychologist’s report confirming the diagnosis. The Employer’s occupational health provider prepared a report confirming that the Claimant was likely to be considered disabled and recommended reasonable adjustments, however the Claimant’s…

Taking into account prior warnings when dismissing

The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) decision in Bandara v British Broadcasting Corporation provides a reminder of the need to be careful when considering prior warnings in the context of deciding to dismiss someone. Mr Bandara worked as a senior producer for the BBC, having commenced employment as a producer in July 1995. He worked within the…

Anti-abuse charity employee awarded £90,000 for “calculated and premeditated” harassment

Roshni is the Urdu word for “light”. In June 2002 millionaire Ali Khan founded the charity of that name which is based in Glasgow. Its stated objectives are: “The advancement of education; the advancement of citizenship or community development; the relief of those in need by reason of age, ill health, disability, financial hardship or…