When can social media posts be used as evidence? – A Snoopy character study

Charlie BrownSocial media. Oh my. We all know the usual story of an employee getting ‘caught out’ by a social media post. But, in reality, social media is a complicated beast and never quite as straightforward as it appears. Can an employer normally rely on social media posts? Probably. Can it always rely on incriminating social media posts? No!

Before we get into it fully, it’s important to consider that even defining ‘social media’ is tricky nowadays. Raise your hands if you think you’re pretty au faux with social media websites? Good, good. So you’ve heard of all of the following: Facebook, WhatsApp, Tumblr, LINE, Telegram, Foursquare and Snapfish. I thought not… (Bonus point if you actually did!)

Now, we all know the standard tale. An employee posts something anti-employer on their social media or posts something that proves dishonest conduct and the employer then pulls out their social media policy, invites the employee to a Disciplinary hearing and a formal sanction (up to and including dismissal) is given. But, in reality, a lot depends on how that information comes to light.

What are the likely implications of Brexit on UK Employment Law/HR practices?

Employers may not be aware that much of the current legislation in place to protect employee rights actually derives from the European Union – for example, working time regulations, rights of the employees on a business transfer (TUPE) and family leave rights to name but a few. Indeed some Politicians for the ‘Leave Campaign’ will no…

Justice Secretary Grayling to use EAT case as political challenge to EU law

Last October Joshua Rozenberg reported in The Guardian that a recent case concerning Moroccan workers in diplomatic missions in London resulted in failed claims for unfair dismissal, unpaid wages and breaches of the Working Time Regulations because the employers were able to claim state immunity. I commented about the case last November. It has now…

we are above the law – or are we?

Under the State Immunity Act 1978 (“the SIA”), sovereign states are not generally subject to the jurisdiction of UK courts and tribunals. The point is well demonstrated by the extraordinary extent to which the London Congestion Charge is ignored by diplomats. Disputes relating to contracts of employment, and related statutory rights, are carved out from…

snooping on employees

If you are an urban dweller in the UK, according to research carried out for The Times, you should expect to be photographed as many as 300 times a day. Combine that with the numerous profiles maintained by advertisers and others based on your internet browsing behaviour and goodness knows what information held by the…

new employment law popping up in the most unlikely locations

As the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill wends its way through parliament, the government keeps adding miscellaneous bits and bobs to it. Perhaps most noteworthy are the proposals to implement regulation of the Press post-Leveson by inserting amendments which appear entirely out of context, primarily because that is precisely what they are! New employment law…

Poundland and (not) human rights

It was difficult to miss the near ubiquitous reporting of the Court of Appeal’s decision in the case of Reilly & Anor, R (on the application of) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, in which it quashed the Jobseeker’s Allowance (Employment and Enterprise) Regulations 2011 SI 2011/917. Contrary to the impression given by…