Working in a heatwave: It ain’t half hot (at work)

ice cream So, the heatwave might finally be over. Or is it? The weather forecast hasn’t exactly been bullet-proof recently. I’ve walked to work recently sheltering from the rain under an umbrella (despite predicted 34 degree sunshine) and towed an umbrella around during a day so ice cream-meltingly warm that it was worthy of Majorca…

Whichever way, I’ve received multiple (only partially jokey) messages asking whether it is ‘too hot’ to work or whether an employer’s dress code is ‘automatically waived’ when it gets ‘too hot’.

Unfortunately, from their point of view at least, there is no maximum temperature at which employers have to crack out the ice cream (albeit this isn’t the worst thing to consider morale wise!) and/or send employees home. Instead, employers simply have to ensure they comply with their duty to safeguard employee wellbeing under Health and Safety regulations. Some methods of doing this can include ensuring there is adequate drinking water, lengthening rest breaks (or providing additional rest breaks) for employees carrying out physical activities and/or providing fans for employees in hot environments. However, there are no mandatory requirements upon employers to cool things down other than to act to avoid foreseeable health risks to staff.

Frozen out: Can it be too cold to work?

Spring is here. Or is that winter? All over the country, people are facing difficulty travelling on account of snow and ice and, here on Merseyside, things are no different.

In fact, this is quickly turning into that time of year when I receive multiple text messages from friends, some more jokey than others, asking if there is a minimum temperature at which they are required to work because their workplace is so cold or, as my favourite text states: ‘so cold as to give a polar bear frostbite!

Now, poorly polar bears aside, there isn’t a set temperature at which staff can suddenly declare it to be too cold and go home without recourse. Even if there was, those staff would be highly unlikely to be paid during their absence from office.

Instead, businesses rely on guidance from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The HSE recommeds that office-based workers be exposed to temperatures no lower than 16C and any workers whose work requires ‘physical effort’ (i.e. being on your feet and moving arond) are not exposed to temperatures below 13C.

However, be very aware of that word above: ‘guidance‘.

The Santa Clause: Employment Law issues in Lapland

Penguin Santa You know who’s having a low media presence this year? Santa Claus! I mean, just look at the Christmas adverts this year! Without naming names, the ‘biggest’ Christmas adverts this year involve a monster, a carrot and a toy factory. The only ‘big’ advert that sees the big, red man is one in which Paddington bear mistakes a burglar for Santa!

So, why the low media presence? Where is Santa?

On that front, I may be able to help. You see, Mr Claus is currently having some Employment Law and HR issues with his workforce and has been busy obtaining legal advice on what to do next. It’s a stressful time of year, particularly with less and less people believing in him (there seems to be a rumour going around that he isn’t real) and certain big rival companies in the logistics business setting up in competition (the main one named after a geographical location considerably far away from Lapland).

Put simply, Christmas needs saving and Santa can’t operate without solving his current employment law issues. With this in mind, let’s go on a Christmas journey and help Santa save Christmas!