US firm starts microchipping employees – Science fiction or the future?

Microchip reader Yes, you read that correctly. Microchipping employees. And, no, that’s a real headline. A technology company in the USA has been widely reported as microchipping employees in place of their security and identity cards.

The first thing to get out of the way here is that they aren’t implanting an actual, square computer chip. Rather, they insert a tiny implant (the same size as a grain of rice) between an employee’s thumb and forefinger with a syringe. Apparently, removing it is akin to taking out a splinter (ouch?)

Now, apparently, the ‘younger generation’ are most likely to get onboard with this in the future. Well, I’m in my twenties and I’m not tempted in the slightest. Saying that, I hate needles, so that’s a poor starting point…

Looking at the wider picture, we live in a world of fingerprint ID on phones and being able to unlock the latest phone handsets with your own face. So why is an implant so controversial?

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Does the recent European Court of Human Rights decision actually ban employee email monitoring?

You’ve probably seen the recent headlines: ‘Employer breached employee’s human right to privacy by reading workplace emails’, ‘Employers can’t place employee communications under surveillance due to human rights’, et cetera, et cetera. The thing is, broadly speaking and barring one key exception, those headlines are wrong.  Why?  Firstly, because the facts of the case were…

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Can employees tracking Transfer Deadline Day today be given the red card?

Today is Transfer Deadline Day. For non-football fans, that phrase will either illicit groans or simple ignorance. However, for football fans, that phrase conjures up images of Harry Redknapp being interviewed leaning out of a car window, Peter Odemwingie turning up to random football stadiums without consent and Liverpool offloading Fernando Torres for £50m and…

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Why dismissal for minor, non-malicious social media posts can constitute unfair dismissal

Employment Law cases can relate to all manner of things: sexist make-up policies, discriminatory Secret Santa gifts and, in the case of one Canadian law suit, a claim by employees for ‘psychological torture’ due to the employer playing Christmas songs on loop from November onwards. I’ve recently read a case worthy of joining this list…

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Will the abolition of Employment Tribunal fees result in ‘old’ 2013-2017 cases being permitted in Tribunal?

Employment Tribunal fees are illegal. This was declared on 26th July 2017 by the Supreme Court in R (on the application of Unison) v Lord Chancellor. Put simply, from that day onwards, Employment Tribunals completely scrapped both issue fees (the fee for submitting a claim form to Tribunal) and the hearing fee (the fee incurred…

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Focus on appearance makes employers unattractive

A jazz bar in London recently came under fire for posting a job advert looking for an “extremely attractive” employee. Predictably (and quite rightly), the internet reacted in protest against the wording of the advert. Was the advert poorly phrased? Absolutely. Is the act of valuing the looks of an employee above skill morally acceptable?…

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