Does a worker’s holiday entitlement continue to accrue into successive years if they do not take their annual leave because their employer will not pay them for these holidays?

The Advocate General at the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has answered ‘yes’ to this question, in a non-binding opinion.

In the case of King v The Sash Window Workshop Ltd, the Claimant, Mr King (who was a self-employed salesperson), brought an Employment Tribunal (ET) claim against the Respondent, The Sash Window Workshop, on the basis that he felt he was owed monies for annual leave that he had accrued, but not taken.  In addition, the Claimant sought compensation for annual leave that he had taken, but not been paid for during the 13 years he had been working for the Respondent – his claim for holiday pay therefore amounted to over £27,000.00.  It is of note that the contract under which Mr King was employed, provided no right to paid annual leave and that this contract was terminated in 2012, on his 65th birthday.  The Claimant also submitted a claim for age discrimination.

The claim was initially heard by the ET in August 2013.  It was ruled at first instance that Mr King was to be deemed a worker for the purposes of the Working Time Regulations 1998, and also that his discrimination claim was well founded.

The Respondent subsequently appealed against the decision of the ET in respect of the holiday pay aspect of the claim, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) allowing the appeal and remitting the holiday claim back to the ET.  Mr King then submitted an appeal to the Court of Appeal who referred the case to the European Court of Justice (ECJ).

ECJ Advocate General Evgeni Tanchev, stated that employers had to provide “adequate facilities to workers” to enable them to take their paid annual leave.  Tanchev further stated:

“A worker, like Mr King, may rely on [EU law] to secure payment in lieu of untaken leave, when no facility has been made available by the employer, for exercise of the right to paid annual leave … Upon termination of the employment relationship a worker is entitled to an allowance in lieu of paid annual leave that has not been taken up.

“I appreciate that the answers to the questions referred I am here proposing would require employers rather than workers to take all the necessary steps to ascertain whether they are bound to create an adequate facility for the exercise of the right to paid annual leave, whether those steps be the taking of legal advice, consultation with relevant unions or seeking counsel from Member State bodies that are responsible for the enforcement of labour law.

“If an employer does not take such action, it will risk having to make a payment in lieu of unpaid leave on termination of the employment relationship. However, this would be in keeping with guaranteeing the effet utile of the right to paid annual leave, a fundamental right of substantive normative weight in Member State law, EU law, and international law, and would also be consistent with the practical reality, recognised in the Court’s case-law, of the worker’s position as the weaker party in the relationship.”

In summary, in situations where workers do not utilise their entitlement to paid holidays as they would not be paid by their employer for doing so, such workers can claim that they were prevented from exercising their right to paid leave.  This right would then carry over until the worker had the opportunity to exercise it, in this particular matter, upon termination of employment.  Any payment in lieu of accrued but untaken holiday entitlement should cover the full period of employment up until the date of termination.

Although the Advocate General’s opinion is not binding, such opinions are normally followed by the full court.  A final decision should be provided in the next few months.

A number of cases have recently been heard by the ECJ to establish whether Company’s operating in the so-called ‘gig economy’ are depriving workers of benefits by classifying them as self-employed.  If Tanchev’s opinion is confirmed, it could mean many UK businesses operating in the same manner as The Sash Window Workshop, would be faced with significant costs.

Please contact Katharine Kelly on 0151 239 1079 or katharinekelly@canter-law.co.uk if you feel that you/your business could be affected by this decision.