Solving the riddle – Uber, Addison Lee, workers, employees and the self-employed

Confusing road sign The media has been awash with stories about ‘worker’ status recently. The most obvious being the recent Employment Tribunal decision that Addison Lee drivers are workers, not self-employed as the private hire taxi firm argued, and the similar decision against Uber a few months ago. The appeal for the Uber case was heard last week in the Employment Appeal Tribunal, albeit the decision will probably be announced in December.

So then, you may conclude, all taxi drivers are workers? No. Okay, so most of them are self-employed? No. Well, they must be full employees then? Not really.

To get into this, we should acknowledge one thing. The definition of “worker” in the Employment Rights Act 1996 is purposefully fuzzy. No, that’s not legal jargon, but an acknowledgement that the status is meant to catch those people who fall between the more obvious categories of employee and self-employed. Stereotypically-speaking, employees are those who work in an office on a rolling contract for a specified number of hours per week and self-employed individuals work for their own business and are ‘their own boss’. Now, in practice, it isn’t that simple, but let’s use those examples as vague signposts for now because, otherwise, I’ll need to name enough qualifications and exceptions to fill an employment textbook chapter!

So, ‘worker’ status is designed for those who aren’t ‘full’ employees or self-employed. But where is the line? Where does a ‘worker’ merge into an employee and when does a ‘worker’ get so far as to be effectively self-employed?

These are very good questions. In fact, they are such good questions that a lot of employers, including Uber, Addison Lee and Deliveroo, end up finding out at Employment Tribunal precisely because it is hard to specify otherwise.