Great British Bake Off: When workplace tensions ‘knead’ solving!

cake

I don’t know who won The Great British Bake Off last night.  That’s a weird place to start a Bake Off-themed employment law blog, I know.  Unfortunately, my wife dozed off in the middle of the final last night, so we have to wait to watch the rest of it online tonight!

With the popularity of the show ballooning in recent years, more and more workplaces have decided to hold ‘Bake Off’ events to raise morale and/or raise money for charity.  I must admit to getting involved with such an event in my second week at a previous employer.

Just to set the background, I’d never properly baked in my life and so, obviously, thought that trying to bake a cake was the right way to win over my new colleagues.  Come the morning of the competition, from the outside at least, the cake looked fantastic.  The problem?  Firstly, it was a rather fragile two-tier cake, so I was forced to drive to work in no higher than fourth gear (to the utter joy of the traffic behind me) and, secondly, because the judge (who no doubt had been studying the critical technique of Paul Hollywood) called my sponge ‘ultimately disappointing’ and my dreams of Bake Off-style glory evaporated in an instant!

Why am I discussing this?  Well, Bake Off events in the workplace have the potential to cause workplace angst and, at very least, can cause staff tensions to rise.

Red Dead Redemption 2: Is ‘crunching’ actually voluntary overtime?

Cowboy Later today, the review embargo lifts on the biggest video game since Grand Theft Auto 5.  Even those of you not of a video gaming persuasion have no doubt noticed the constant advertisements online, on the TV and on the side of buses for “Red Dead Redemption”.

What is Red Dead Redemption 2?  Well, it’s an adventure game set in the Wild West with the almost mandatory mix of horse chases, gun-slinging and exploring a vast desert-esque landscape.

So, why is it such a big deal?  One word: Rockstar.  Rockstar are the equivalent of Apple 10 years ago.  By that, I mean that nearly every product they make receives rave reviews (at least 95% on average) and is known for its brutal, gritty storytelling.  As an example of their attention to detail, in some shape or form, work on this game has been ongoing for eight years with a budget larger than many Hollywood movies!

So, surely, eight years is more than enough to make a good game.  Well, yes.  But Rockstar want to make ‘extraordinary’ games not just good or very good ones.  And this, unfortunately for them, has led to a lot of media controversy over supposedly ‘voluntary’ overtime and the issue of ‘crunching’.

Let’s tackle the media controversy first.

Mental Health First Aid in the workplace

October the 10th marked World Mental Health Day, a time to stop and consider how we can best support those around us who may be struggling. Given the amount of time we collectively spend in the workplace each week, particular thought should be given to the importance of mental health support at work. 

There is already
legislation in place providing the requirement for employers to ensure employees receive immediate attention if they are injured or taken ill at work,
but what about helping those suffering with mental illness? If an employee for example has a panic attack or is expressing suicidal thoughts?

The concept of
‘Mental Health First Aid’ originated in Australia where Professor Anthony Jorm, a researcher from the University of Melbourne was discussing with his wife, Betty Kitchener, a registered nurse, a recent mental health conference that he had attended. Within the conversation it was remarked that ‘What we really need is first aid for depression’. The idea has spread rapidly from there – developing
into an internationally recognised programme comprised of simple steps that can be called upon to help a person in distress.

Tick, tock: Will employees have longer to bring Employment Tribunal claims in the future?

Employment Tribunal fees. Simple, right? Everyone knows that employees ‘have three months to claim’ and that’s that? Not really. What about the fact that Equal Pay claims (and certain other types of claim) have a six-month time limit? That doesn’t tie into the presumption of simplicity. What about an employee who is dismissed on 2nd January and serves a 3 month notice period, so their last day is 1st April – do you count the three months from notification of dismissal or from their final day at work? How much does a period of Acas Early Conciliation extend any given time limit by? I could go on and on…

Overall, what is surely uncontroversial for both employees and employers alike is that simplicity is key. If everyone understands how long an employee has to bring a claim, everyone has the certainty of knowing the period within which to consider conciliation, negotiation and/or the obtaining advice regarding a prospective claim.

An unwanted kiss is “Strictly” verboten at work

Strictly Come Dancing

Last Monday I watched the evening’s newspaper front pages coming in on Twitter and nearly every one featured the romantic kiss between celebrity Sean(n) Walsh and professional dancer Katya Jones caught by The Sun on what happened to be his girlfriend’s birthday. It was the lead and second lead news on the BBC News website. Seann’s now ex-girlfriend who had been shown in the audience on Saturday evening’s programme was understandably unimpressed and her public response to their public indiscretion is worth seeing as one of the best put downs I’ve seen for some time.

So why am I writing about this on the Employment Solutions blog. Well, there was an interesting case reported this month which cost an employer £24,000 for similar behaviour in work, albeit non-consensual.

Discrimination in Recruitment: How to Avoid Discriminatory Advertisements

It is important that employers are mindful of their obligation to carry out a recruitment and selection process that is non-discriminatory in nature. Employers should therefore allocate sufficient time and care when publishing job advertisements so as not to be caught out – there is no cap on damages awarded at the Employment Tribunal for a successful discrimination claim so any mistake could prove very costly.

As a
starting point, a job advertisement must not discriminate on the basis of any
of the nine protected characteristics as defined under the Equality Act 2010,
which as a refresher are: