Great British Bake Off: When workplace tensions ‘knead’ solving!

cake

I don’t know who won The Great British Bake Off last night.  That’s a weird place to start a Bake Off-themed employment law blog, I know.  Unfortunately, my wife dozed off in the middle of the final last night, so we have to wait to watch the rest of it online tonight!

With the popularity of the show ballooning in recent years, more and more workplaces have decided to hold ‘Bake Off’ events to raise morale and/or raise money for charity.  I must admit to getting involved with such an event in my second week at a previous employer.

Just to set the background, I’d never properly baked in my life and so, obviously, thought that trying to bake a cake was the right way to win over my new colleagues.  Come the morning of the competition, from the outside at least, the cake looked fantastic.  The problem?  Firstly, it was a rather fragile two-tier cake, so I was forced to drive to work in no higher than fourth gear (to the utter joy of the traffic behind me) and, secondly, because the judge (who no doubt had been studying the critical technique of Paul Hollywood) called my sponge ‘ultimately disappointing’ and my dreams of Bake Off-style glory evaporated in an instant!

Why am I discussing this?  Well, Bake Off events in the workplace have the potential to cause workplace angst and, at very least, can cause staff tensions to rise.