Was Maurizio Sarri smoked like a Kepa during the League Cup Final? – Refusing to obey reasonable management instructions

First, a confession. I’m a big football fan and regularly post legal blogs trying to link football to employment law. Sometimes there is an obvious link (i.e. a football manager being sacked) and sometimes the link is more tenuous (i.e. a previous blog many moons ago in which I tried to link a Luis Suarez blog to an employment law situation!)

However, during the recent League Cup Final (yes, I refuse to refer
to the tournament by the sponsor’s name), there was a golden employment-related
opportunity.  Yes, naturally, I’m talking
about Kepa Arrizabalaga’s refusal to accept his substitution from the game in
the 119th minute. 

In fact, the opportunity was perhaps so obvious that I
woke up on Monday morning to a LinkedIn post wondering how long it would be
until I posted a blog on the topic.  So
here it is.

In fact, the opportunity was perhaps so obvious that I
woke up on Monday morning to a LinkedIn post wondering how long it would be
until I posted a blog on the topic.  So
here it is.

Rather than my usual method of substituting the real-life
situation for a fictional one (i.e. in the Luis Suarez example above, I created
a fictional employee in a factory who bit a colleague), I’ll explore the actual
situation at Chelsea and their options.

Kepa Arrizabalaga (who I’ll call “Kepa” for the rest of
the blog) no doubt has a contract at the club to represent the club to his full
ability.  This would involve training,
keeping fit, playing games he is picked for and, as per all employees,
the implied duty of ‘obeying reasonable management instructions’.  Naturally, it doesn’t take a law degree to
conclude that Kepa’s refusal to obey his manager’s decision to be substituted
from a Cup Final is a likely failure of his Contract of Employment with the
club, both in terms of a complete, literal failure to obey reasonable
management instructions from his Manager and, also, bringing the club into
disrepute and/or failing to represent the club in good faith.