Katharine deals with all aspects of Employment Law but specialises in providing non contentious employment advice and compliance to both small business ventures and larger companies. In particular, she is experienced in giving advice to companies concerning starting out in industry and reorganisation and can draft a wide range of company documentation in accordance with the individual needs of the business. Katharine specialises in making sure that employers have all their employment law and HR requirements in place and up to date. Her pleasant manner is combined with her knowledge of employment law issues from a legal perspective so that she makes sure that employers have maximum protection and immediate support in connection with all problems which they may encounter on a day to day basis.

Christian doctor David Mackereth loses trans beliefs case

You may recall my post back in July of this year, detailing the case of Christian doctor David Mackereth, and his claims that his contract had been terminated due to his refusal to use transgender pronouns. By way of a very brief summary, when starting a new role as a contract worker at the DWP…

The risks of writing honestly – a Karl Ove Knausgard-based perspective

I’ve recently started re-reading one of my all-time favourite books, A Man in Love (My Struggle Book 2) by Karl Ove Knausgard. It may sound like a romantic book but, in fact, it is brutal. No other word can reflect and sum up this book in its lengthy entirety: brutal. Basically, the book acts as…

UK announces 2-year post-study work visa for international students

In the years 2017 – 2018 the
number of international students studying here in the UK was 458,490 and the UK is at present the second most popular study destination worldwide. A report
completed for the Government by the Migration Advisory Committee in September last year however, indicated that the UK runs the risk of being overtaken for second spot by Southern Hemisphere rival Australia.

With course costs for international students being significantly higher than those for ‘home’ students educational institutions from all over the UK benefit from the revenue that international students bring.

Employment Law Snippet – No.4 – Honeymoons

Hello and welcome to our fourth Employment Law Snippet article. This week, we’ll be looking at honeymoons and how they affect employees and employers alike.

So, honeymoons. A slightly wonderful and unique concept within employment law and a (usually) once-in-a-lifetime experience for the couple. As with everything, everyone’s mileage will vary – some will go to a 5-star island hideaway and spend 3 weeks by the beach whilst others, who won’t be named, may road-trip across Canada gaining an unstable addiction to maple syrup, falling in love with the Toronto Maple Leafs ice hockey team and failing, despite maximum efforts, to see any of the rather elusive native moose (ahem!)

Would the Labour Party’s employment reforms work?

On 10 September, the Labour Party put forward plans to create a Ministry for Employment Rights and a Workers’ Protection Agency to enforce those rights.

The proposals which, obviously, would only see if the light of day if Labour won a General Election, whenever such an election may occur, are ambitious and, naturally, rather scant on detail at the moment. But, despite this, let’s have a look at a few of their proposals for changes to employment law to see if they are realistic and workable!

Sacked for using a plastic cup?!


Intelligent Hand Dryers, a Company based in Sheffield specialising in, well, Hand Dryers, has recently introduced a ban on its employees using single use plastic including plastic water bottles, sandwich wrappers with plastic ‘windows’, and disposable coffee cups with plastic linings, in order to reduce its environmental impact.

The owner of the Company, Andrew Cameron, has made the above a disciplinary offence and stated that if employees receive three warnings and continue to ignore this policy, they could be dismissed.  The environmental benefits, if more businesses were to impose such policies, are obvious however is it fair to effectively make this a condition of employment?  Surely the choice of an employee to buy a sandwich from a well-known supermarket at lunch time does not hinder their ability to perform their role?