Does the recent European Court of Human Rights decision actually ban employee email monitoring?

You’ve probably seen the recent headlines: ‘Employer breached employee’s human right to privacy by reading workplace emails’, ‘Employers can’t place employee communications under surveillance due to human rights’, et cetera, et cetera. The thing is, broadly speaking and barring one key exception, those headlines are wrong.  Why?  Firstly, because the facts of the case were…

why do politicians “do God” and how does a “Christian UK” sit with employment law?

A great deal of hot air has been generated as a result of David Cameron’s decision to play up his faith in the Church of England. His article suggests a warm beer and village greens approach to his Christianity – “…I appreciate its liturgy, and the architecture and cultural heritage of its churches. My parents…

Justice Secretary Grayling to use EAT case as political challenge to EU law

Last October Joshua Rozenberg reported in The Guardian that a recent case concerning Moroccan workers in diplomatic missions in London resulted in failed claims for unfair dismissal, unpaid wages and breaches of the Working Time Regulations because the employers were able to claim state immunity. I commented about the case last November. It has now…