Barista rights: Starbucks or Starbucked?

Right, to start, a confession: I’m a coffee fanatic. And, no, that doesn’t mean that I purely order espresso shots and seek to then identify the origin of the exact coffee bean used when drinking it; rather, I regularly seek out coffee as a near necessary small luxury in life.

Now, that doesn’t mean I literally can’t function
without it. I managed to give it up for
40 days over Lent a few years ago, albeit my wife has practically banned me
from doing so again (the first week of work absent coffee wasn’t the most fun
experience!) But, overall, in a
stressful day, my instinct is to reach for a nice cup of java (whilst, if
you’re interested, is the name of an island they used to obtain coffee beans
from (as was the island of Mocha (seriously!))

Why the sudden fascination in coffee? Well, I’ve recently been reading an
intriguing book called ‘Starbucked’ by Taylor Clark. And, no, it isn’t a demolition job of Starbucks (nor a ‘fanbook’ financed by the company); rather, it is a neutral and balanced
look at the growth of Starbucks and also explores their employment practices
and treatment of staff.

As many are aware, Starbucks haven’t had the best
treatment in the press in recent years in relation to staff treatment (or,
indeed, their policies of allegedly ‘minimising’ tax liability). But how much of that is true?

a right to strike?

Technically, there is no such thing in British law as a right to strike. The right is not to suffer a detriment as a result of taking part in a strike, provided the strike has been properly called. So, contrary to anything Mr Clarkson of the jeans and jacket combo might say, provided that proper…