Tribunal claims cost £8,500 each to defend

The British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) has undertaken research which shows that the average cost for an employer to defend itself at an employment tribunal is £8,500 whereas the average cost to settle is £5,400, making settlement the cheaper option. Last year there were more claims made than ever (236,100) and the current recession is…

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Associative discrimination – when a “gay pub” becomes a “gastropub”

In Lisboa -v- Realpubs Limited and others the Employment Appeal Tribunal was asked to consider whether the employer’s policy of encouraging a wider clientele at what was previously recognised as a gay pub led to less favourable treatment of gay customers which in turn caused Mr Lisboa to resign in circumstances amounting to discriminatory constructive…

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Equality Act – positive discrimination

On Sunday 23 January the Daily Mail published an article under the heading “Equality Madness” in which it said that the government is spending tens of millions of pounds in order to comply with the terms of the Equality Act 2010. Examples referred to include £100,000 spent on a DEFRA report investigating how efforts to…

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newsletter – salaried partners

The status of a “salaried partner” can be important.  This is so not only if a firm is in financial difficulty (as partners but not staff are generally liable for a firm’s debts) but also for employment law purposes (as partners, not being “employees”, do not have many employment law rights such as unfair dismissal rights).  With the…

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newsletter – phoney discrimination claims

One of the problems with anti-discrimination law is that it sometimes results in “phoney claims”.  The problem must, of course, be kept in perspective and overall the fact that the law is sometimes abused is a small price to pay for the valuable protections it affords to genuine victims. The problems of phoney claims generally centre around job…

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